Articles and Reviews
Bibliography article icon

Eleanor Heartney, Jackie Lipton’s Paintings
Published by Danette Koke Fine Art, 1994

Bibliography article icon

John Ash, Jackie Lipton’s New Work,
Published by Danette Koke Fine Art, 1995

Bibliography article icon

Eleanor HEARTNEY, New Art Examiner 1984
“Jackie Lipton at the Condeso Lawler Gallery”

Bibliography article icon

Ken Sofer, Art in America, New Paintings by Jackie Lipton at the Condeso/Lawler Gallery, NYC, 1985

Bibliography article icon

Jackie Lipton’s
LAVISH INTERIORS
By Eileen Myles
2009 PROVINCETOWN ARTS

Bibliography article icon

Manuel Maccarula
pintamanuel.blogspot.com
Exhibition, Jackie Lipton at Corinne Robbins

Bibliography article icon

the Villager

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933




Selected Website Listings
Bibliography external website link icon

Provincetown Arts Magazine

Bibliography external website link icon

WOMR Interview on Art Talk with Chris Busa, Part 1

Bibliography external website link icon

https://soundcloud.com/jackielipton/sets/jackies-interviews

Bibliography external website link icon

WOMR Interview on Art Talk with Chris Busa, Part 2

Bibliography external website link icon

https://soundcloud.com/womr-podcasts/artist-jackie-lipton-part2/
women
utm_source=soundcloud&utm_campaign=share&utm_medium

Bibliography external website link icon

The Villager

Bibliography external website link icon

Manuel Maccarula
pintamanuel.blogspot.com

Bibliography external website link icon

Kate Beck

Bibliography external website link icon

www.jameswagner.com

Books and Catalogues

“A Look Forward, A Look Back” catalogue, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, 1986

“New Visions” catalogue, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, 1980

Manuel Maccarula
pintamanuel.blogspot.com

Corinne Robbins, whose space has functioned, for some 5 years, as a furniture showroom, has opened her first fine art exhibition with the ambitious and energetic paintings of Jackie Lipton. Ms. Lipton works in oil paint, cold wax and alkyd media. Her press release speaks about her commitment to process, which is evident in her canvases. It also speaks of her as an abstract cityscape painter. This may be less evident, but an abstract painter residing in New York City, as she does, may be an abstract cityscape painter, not literally, but psychologically.

There’s nothing wrong with a little straight ahead abstract expressionism and Jackie Lipton gives it to you. The notion that pictures made in certain genres already noted in the art history books are passé carry no weight here. The painter Nell Blaine, for example, made great, very energetic fauvist paintings this side of World War II. She’s due much recognition from those who like their paintings to demonstrate such energy. Ms. Lipton’s paintings, too, are generally intense, and give pleasure to those who rock to that aesthetic.

“Because the Night,” 2005, makes the most of its under layers. Its bumps and ridges achieve a uniform, atmospheric crudeness. If you could work yourself up you could call it ugly. If the surface were a sound it would possess the chronic raspyness heard in Bob Dylan’s late recordings. It evokes a dusty, pocked and neglected plaster wall (abstract cityscape, anyone?) Its narrow palette, the consistency of its scratchy brushwork, and the singularity of its appearance among Jackie Lipton’s work, make for a savory picture viewing experience.

That painting, measuring 52” X 64”, along with others in that size range, among them “Whirl Away,” and “Ghost Dance,” show Ms. Lipton is comfortable working on a large scale. In them, she effects a bold gesture that carries at a distance. Forcefully executed statements on this scale say, “monumental.” When I stand before these I experience the artist’s bravery in the exploration of pictorial issues.

Given works disappoint me, though such works are in the minority. “Christopher,” 2007, one of the large ones, is one such picture. For me, the relentless and over saturated yellow that runs throughout this surface gives the other colors, all of which look wan, by comparison, “no chance to talk.” Color is always a matter of relationship, regardless of the content. For that yellow’s expressiveness to bloom it might have to congregate with other, equally strident colors, on some other canvas. But, again, as I looked around the show, I found much to enjoy.

Some of Jackie Lipton’s notable smaller statements include “Breath to Breath Series #6, 2007, with the colors and texture of watermelon pulp, which may cause you to salivate in anticipation of a tasty summer treat. Also, “Up There Down There #11, 2006, with it’s subtle and alluring tonality. Looking at this one you may forget, momentarily, that Ms. Lipton is adept at play with more flamboyant colors.

Corinne Robbins is off to an exciting beginning with her fine art exhibitions. We should also expect many more ambitious and satisfying statements from Jackie Lipton. The current show continues to May 17, 2009.

Manuel Maccarula
pintamanuel.blogspot.com
Exhibition, Jackie Lipton at Corinne Robbins

http://pintamanuel.blogspot.com/2009/05/corinne-robbins-whose-space-has.html#comments